Georgia: Peace in Our Families

This is the second article written by Marina Tabukashvili from the Taso Foundation in Georgia, Retaj partners in the Sharing for Empowerment project conducted in Lithuania in September 2015.

logo

In 2001, as we were shooting a film in an ethnic minority village, we spoke with the head wife of a man who stretched his arms saying, “What law are you talking about? Tbilisi? Where is Tbilisi?” Tbilisi was one hour away northeast by car. At that point, I thought, “Probably they don’t beat their wives here.” Continue reading

Georgian Women, Rural Women

This article is written by Marina Tabukashvili from the Taso Foundation, Georgia. Marina together with five other Georgian women participated in the Sharing for Empowerment project organized by the Lithuanian Center for Equality Enhancement, in which Retaj are also partners. Please scroll down for pictures from Georgia.

Georgian Women, Rural Women

I am the director of a women’s national fund. I have been in this line of work for fifteen years. Since 2004, we have been working in villages, with rural, conflict-affected, internally displaced, and ethnic minority women, and this entitles me to speak not only about but also on behalf of these women. Continue reading

Retaj Delegation Arrive in Lithuania for International Project with Georgia

Retaj Women have safely arrived in Lithuania!

Lithuania on the map.

Retaj Foundation for Palestinian Women is honored to participate in the international project “Women in (post)Conflict Situations” organized by the Center for Equality Advancement (Republic of Lithuania, EU).

Women from Palestine, Georgia, and Lithuania will spend the week together learning from each other and sharing experiences. The programme is packed with workshops, meetings, lectures, and discussions. Continue reading

VIDEO: We Travel Palestine – On Camera

At 8 am that sunny Sunday morning 18 children gathered at Retaj, waiting for the bus to take them on a field trip to Sebastiya, a Roman village north of Nablus. A half-hour away from their native Asira, none of the children had been to Sebastiya before.

In high spirits and with backpacks full of home-made sandwiches, the children were waiting impatiently for the day to start, a day that would take them to Sebastiya, a soap factory in Nablus, and an urban park filled with swings and sunshine. Continue reading